Goal: Setting yourself up to fail Part 2

SMART Goal Continued

I started the other day by going through the SMART goal frame work and the meaning behind it. In this post I will discuss the framework’s draw backs, risks and limitations.

Risks

When planning a SMART goal, it’s important to be very ‘realistic’. You should go through all the apparent risks on that part of the frameowrk. Failure to do this can cause a few holes in the logic or risks to appear. For example a car manufacturer that wants to be the market leader in cheap cars. They may set themselves a goal to produce a car that costs consumers less than £5,000. This if course looks great on paper and would be a revolutionary idea. However, cheap parts means potentially a cheap job and could risjk the compaines future business plans. The bottom line is to evaluate the risks and not be too unrealistic.

Be aware not to set up too many goals at one time, it can be great to have a whole board set up with several tasks for the New Year. What is likely to happen is that they will either confilct with one another or you will get confused by trying to keep up with everything. Have one or two core goals that you are chasing at any given time.

Accountability

The SMART goal framework works well if you are able to discipline yourslef to achieve what you need to. There isn’t, however, any accountability included. To be properly successful with this framework you must make sure you are accountable to something or someone. This can be a close relative or partner. If you aren’t fully committed to what you’re doing then there is a risk that with no strong accountability, the goal will be lost.

Reliability

The person you choose to be accountable to needs to be reliable. Reliable so that when you’re faltering below where you should be, they will step in and re-position you in the right place to continue the goals. Briefness is a must here, and they must be able to remind you of any times you fall off the wagon.

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Goals: Setting yourself up to fail

Goals setting: The process

Goals are imperative to achieving something. If you have a target that you want to reach then it must be done in a calucalted adn methodical approach. Most of the time this is done through “Smart Goals”. This is a way to break down the goal down into manageable pieces and also allows you to track your progress effectively.

So many people do not go through this imperative process, and set themselves up to fail. Similarly, people attempt this process but don’t fully understand what it is or how it works. This article will help you understand the process a little better.

‘SMART’ Goals

I have a love hate relationship with this method of goal setting. Initially I found it very annoying, but I have come to realise it is a very useful tool in goals acquisition. Each of the letters stand for something but also have a vast depth of understanding behind them.

Specific

Specific means to be precise. Many goals are lost or just forgotten because they are too complex. Keep it simple and it will stay attainable.

Measureable

This is a means of how you will measure your progress through the goal. If it is a training goal, then you will use a notepad or measureing tape for example. It must be measured in a tangible way, otherwise it will never be completed.

Achieveable

This is a way of reality checking your goal, is it actually achieveable within the time frame you have set, or with the resources you have? Make sure the goal is bullet-proof otherwise it will fail at the first hurdle.

Realistic

Something else to consider is that it is actually within the realm of possibility. As a trainer I’ve had people with extreme goals in their mind, such as losing a stone in a week. All the positive encouragement in the world will not complete that goal healthilty. Make sure that it is realistic.

Timebound

Very important. Without a time limit or deadline then you might as well be not doing anything. Make sure it’s an appropriate deadline that you can reallistically stick too. Otherwise, as above, your goals will never work.